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  1. #21
    Deo


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Gift received at 08-14-2012, 11:22 AM from KremeChoco
    Quote Originally Posted by Pettanko View Post
    I'm basiclly asking like, is there exact english translations to the korean alphabet? like the actual korean alphabet having a translation of every letter.
    Hi! Sorry for the lateness of the reply; I have been inactive for a bit but am now back to nurse this thread ^_^. I'm still a bit confused by your question, but I think you mean one of two things:

    1) Actual meaning associated with each letter, for example does ㅁmean anything. The answer to this question is no! ㅁmeans absolutely nothing by itself, although Korean letters do have names, just like in English.

    2) Romanization (as in, does each Korean letter have a direct English counterpart) the answer to this is no

    Okay, I will add a more comprehensive version of this in the guide:

    Here is a quirk with Korean you probably didn't know:

    The consonants ㅂ,ㅈ,ㄷ,ㄱ(,ㄴ,ㅁ) in reality have two forms, although the ones in parenthesis less so. Basically, at the start of a word or sentence, these consonants are pronounced 'stiffly' if you will. This is why many people equate them to 'b, p' for ㅂ for example, because it could be pronounced two ways.

    In the guide, I put 저 as "cheo." The ㅈ is pronounced as a 'ch' or ㅊ when it's in the beginning of a word or phrase, while when it is in the middle, it is spoken as "j." Honestly, romanization is your #1 enemy with reading Korean. It can be so confusing/ mind boggling to read romanized Korean. If the first English letter is 'stiffly' and the second is 'softly,' here is a translation of those consonants:

    ㅂ-p, b
    ㅈ-ch, j
    ㄷ-t, d
    ㄱ-k, g
    (ㄴ-d, n
    ㅁ-b, m)

    The ones in parenthesis are uncommon to be heard as (d/b), but you will hear it for certain words like- 물-*bool* 'water', (and) 누구-*doogoo* 'who.'

    Also, the Korean vowels ㅓ and ㅡ are extremely hard for English speakers to pronounce or even represent in English letters! Their romanizations, however, are ㅓ-eo and ㅡ-eu. If you have to just pronounce them as closely as possible (you can't get your mouth to make those sounds), go for ㅓas ㅗ and ㅡ as ㅜ.

    Hope this helped!

    Also, I will be adding my replies into the original post itself to declutter this thread ^^;
    Last edited by Koshenya; 10-30-2013 at 01:16 AM.
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  2. #22
    Deo


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Gift received at 08-14-2012, 11:22 AM from KremeChoco
    Finishing up some replies,

    @Super☆ telling apart words while reading is not an issue, yes, like you said. However, while listening, there are still many words that could sound the same (especially when in a sentence) that can make it a pain. Its all about context...

    @darkiller the second letter is not the double consonant pronunciation. Double consonant would be the same, but with double letters. For example, "ㄲ-kk, gg." This would be the 'more sound/power/energy into the consonant' effect, haha
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  3. #23
    Wild Boar
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    Nice! This is actually really helpful!

  4. #24
    Horntail
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Gift received at 08-14-2012, 11:22 AM from KremeChoco
    I've found that in Korean, when you translate sentence or want to translate english phrases into Korean, the Last section goes first.... *Correct me if I'm wrong*

    every Friday at 6 PM (KST), you can listen to Hyunwoo and Adrien LIVE on the radio
    14(6)시(KST)에서 매주 금요일, 라디오에서는 현우와 아드리엔 라이브로 들리요. <---- Not sure if this is correct...
    [Time][Day],[Radio][With whom?][Object-Live][Verb] <---- Also please correct me~!
    Last edited by SpiritOfMir; 11-07-2013 at 05:29 AM.


  5. #25
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Gift received at 08-14-2012, 11:22 AM from KremeChoco
    Quote Originally Posted by SpiritOfMir View Post
    I've found that in Korean, when you translate sentence or want to translate english phrases into Korean, the Last section goes first.... *Correct me if I'm wrong*

    every Friday at 6 PM (KST), you can listen to Hyunwoo and Adrien LIVE on the radio
    14(6)시(KST)에서 매주 금요일, 라디오에서는 현우와 아드리엔 라이브로 들리요. <---- Not sure if this is correct...
    [Time][Day],[Radio][With whom?][Object-Live][Verb] <---- Also please correct me~!
    Hi SpiritOfMir!... I actually know you from twitter, haha. Well, good job on the sentence! It is a somewhat complex sentence, so I will correct it.

    First of all, these days, Koreans don't use military time so much. Although they wouldn't say 'KST,' I would structure the time like this: "KST 오후 6시에." (not sure what time you meant, so I just put 6...)

    들리다 is like ehh... "To let listen?" It doesn't really fit in this sentence. Use 들어도 돼요 instead! Those are your only major mistakes.

    Corrected ver.: '매주 금요일날 KST 오후 6시에 라이브 라디오에서 현우와 아드리엔을 들어도 돼요.' 라이브 라디오-live radio (vs. live on the radio)

    I won't make a definite statement on Korean word order... As long as the verb comes at the end, the words could be in almost any order, and it would be understandable. While certain orders sound more natural (ex-[subject][object][verb]) You could technically go for [object][subject][verb] since the verb is still at the end. Ex- 라디오를 나는 들었다.

    It depends on your emphasis. The parts of the sentence that you want to emphasis (I'm doing it ON THURSDAY.) (I'M doing it on Thursday.) (I'm doing IT on Thursday.) would usually go first in the sentence. Although the same emphasis can't truly be achieved with the verb, since it has to always come at the end of the sentence. I hope that helped!
    Last edited by Koshenya; 11-08-2013 at 04:05 AM.
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  6. #26
    Horntail
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Gift received at 08-14-2012, 11:22 AM from KremeChoco
    Thank you @Koshenya for your help! Also is "Blah blah blah 먹는 blah blah" present Progressive?
    like "김밥은 먹는데"

    p.s. I hope I follow you on twitter.


  7. #27
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Gift received at 08-14-2012, 11:22 AM from KremeChoco
    Quote Originally Posted by SpiritOfMir View Post
    Thank you @Koshenya for your help! Also is "Blah blah blah 먹는 blah blah" present Progressive?
    like "김밥은 먹는데"

    p.s. I hope I follow you on twitter.
    No problem! Yes, you do follow me on twitter.(: Well, your example is correct (should have used 을), but 먹는 is kind of an adjective. "내가 먹는 밥." = The food I eat. "내가 쓰는 편지."= The letters I write. The main way people express present progressive is by ~고 있다. 나는 밥을 먹고 있어요.=I'm eating. 나는 편지를 쓰고 있어요.=I'm writing a letter.

    "김밥[을] 먹는데" Means "I'm eating kimbap, but..." or "I'm eating kimbap, so what?"
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  8. #28
    Horntail
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Gift received at 08-14-2012, 11:22 AM from KremeChoco
    OMG That makes so much more sense! Like I've seen things with Blah blah [X]는 Blah Blah and been like, where is the verb in this sentence!


  9. #29
    Deo


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Gift received at 08-14-2012, 11:22 AM from KremeChoco
    Quote Originally Posted by SpiritOfMir View Post
    OMG That makes so much more sense! Like I've seen things with Blah blah [X]는 Blah Blah and been like, where is the verb in this sentence!
    Haha :) If you have any other questions, feel free to pm me.
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